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Environmental Justice Toolbox

Here you can explore tools, papers, publications, and much more to support your work in environmental justice. Use the filters to the right to explore different categories.

The Rachel Carson Council (RCC) hosted a panel, “Overcoming Corporate Threats to Academic and Community Environmental Health Research on Industrial Animal Production,” on June 9th at the Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences conference at American University. The event specifically focused an environmental justice lens on the hog industry in North Carolina (NC), addressing the health impacts on communities surrounding confined animal feeding operations, or CAFOs. Panelists included NC Environmental Justice Network co-director Naeema Muhammad, Earthjustice lawyer Marianne Engelman Lado, and RCC President Robert Musil. Tracy Perkins of Howard University moderated the discussion.

Members of North Carolina Environmental Justice Network picket Harris Teeter store in Rocky Mt. in support of Justice at Smithfield Campaign.

This video depicts a panel titled “Labor Movement & International Solidarity in EJ ” on October 17, 2015. This panel was organized during the 17th Annual North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit at Franklinton Center at Bricks in Whitakers, NC.

Rick Dove, a former Neuse RiverKeeper, and Naeema Muhammad, a founding co-director of the North Carolina Justice Network, tell of their work and experiences in working for clean water in North Carolina. Their presentations were given at the Factory Farm Summit in Green Bay, WI, sponsored by Socially Responsible Agriculture Project.

On February 8th, 2014, North Carolina will see the largest, most diverse and visionary cross-issue mass mobilization ever in the state. This assembly is happening in response to regressive legislation that has poured of the North Carolina General Assembly that is adversely affecting North Carolinians.

This video depicts a presentation titled . It also includes a session called “community speak-out and government listening panel”. These presentations took place at the 18 Annual Environmental Justice Summit.

This is a video recording of the keynote speech from Manzoor Cheema during the 2015 EJ Summit.

This video depicts a concert in celebration of Steve Wing on October 16, 2015. This concert took place during the 17th Annual North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit at Franklinton Center at Bricks in Whitakers, NC.

This video depicts a panel titled “Connecting EJ and International Solidarity Against State Violence ” on October 17, 2015. This panel was organized during the 17th Annual North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit at Franklinton Center at Bricks in Whitakers, NC

This video features a forum titled “EJ and Forward Together/Not One Step Back” at the 16th Annual Environmental Justice Summit. This summit took place at Whitakers, NC, on Oct. 17-18, 2014, and was organized by Environmental Justice Network.

This video depicts an award ceremony during the 17th Annual North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit at Franklinton Center at Bricks in Whitakers, NC.

In North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Georgia, millions of residents are bracing for the arrival of Hurricane Florence, which meteorologists are warning could unleash life-threatening storm surges and historic flooding across a wide swath of the East Coast. Even if the storm weakens, experts warn Hurricane Florence could kill thousands of farm animals and trigger catastrophic waste spills from sewage treatment plants, hog waste lagoons and chicken farms. Many of the factory hog farms in North Carolina store their waste by spraying it on nearby fields and neighborhoods, or by depositing it in lagoons that can overflow during hurricanes, causing the toxic pig manure to pour into nearby waterways. We speak with Naeema Muhammad organizing co-director for the North Carolina Environmental Justice Network and Will Hendrick, staff attorney with the Waterkeeper Alliance. Courtesy of Democracy Now.

Property of the NC Environmental Justice Network.

There are nearly 9 million pigs in North Carolina… and 10 million humans. There are a dozen counties in in the state where pigs actually outnumber humans, but most of these animals live their short lives in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). They are rarely if ever seen by the general public…

This video depicts an event titled “Steve Wing Celebration” on October 16, 2015, during the 17th Annual North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit at Franklinton Center at Bricks in Whitakers, NC.

Naeema Muhammed of the North Carolina Environmental Justice Network describes the environmental devastation caused by the pork industry in North Carolina. She is interviewed by Mikisa Thompson of Workers World Party.

In eastern North Carolina, residents are battling with one of the state’s largest industries: hog farms. Last week, North Carolina lawmakers passed House Bill 467, which limits the damages that residents could collect against hog farms. The billion-dollar industry is primarily clustered in the eastern part of the state, where hog farms collect billions of gallons of untreated pig feces and urine in what are essentially cesspools, then dispose of the waste by spraying it into the air. Residents living in the area of the spray complain of adverse health effects and odor so bad that it limits their ability to be outdoors. For more, we speak with Naeema Muhammad, organizing co-director for the North Carolina Environmental Justice Network, and Will Hendrick, staff attorney with the Waterkeeper Alliance and manager of the organization’s North Carolina Pure Farms, Pure Waters campaign. Courtesy of Democracy Now.

Naeema Muhammed tells of her visit to the community of Santa Cruz in Rio de Janeiro, and the toxic burden that community is facing at the hands of industry.

This video includes interviews with community members about the issues they face in their communities and how the Environmental Justice Network helped them to address these issues.

This video includes interviews with community members about how they discovered the Environmental Justice Network and what it has meant for their organizational and community success.

EPA’s EJ Legal Tools examines legal responsibilities for EPA policy makers to consider in their efforts to address EJ under Plan EJ 2014.

A “must-read” for understanding the responsibilities that Federal agencies must adhere to when addressing Environmental Justice in minority populations and low-income populations.

The President’s Memorandum of Understanding to Executive Order 12898, signed February 11, 1994.

HIA is a systematic process administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that provides advice on how communities can stay healthy.

NC DENR’s Environmental Equity Initiative, effective October 19, 2000, which outlines DENR’s goals for Environmental Equity and strategy to achieve the EJ goals.

Find health department contact information by county on the NC Association of Local Health Directors’ Health Depts. by County website.

This site, established by the NC Dept. of Public Health, provides free fact sheets, studies, and information on health hazards and environmental conditions.

This site provides free access to numerous databases, text files, and conferences on the environment.

The US Dept. of Justice’s website for Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The roots of institutional racism are deep and difficult to eliminate. Even in today’s society, racism influences where a person lives, works and plays. Racism also influences the likelihood of exposure to environmental toxins.

EJCOCs provide valuable opportunities to better understand environmental justice problems. EJCOCs should be targeted by policy-makers for environmental reparations or remedies to compensate or restore environmental quality to comparable levels and should be afforded special protection from additional adverse impacts.

WE, THE PEOPLE OF COLOR, gathered together at this multinational People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit, to begin to build a notional and international movement of all peoples of color to fight the destruction and taking of our lands and communities, do hereby re-establish our spiritual interdependence to the sacredness of our Mother Earth; to respect and celebrate each of our cultures, languages and beliefs about the natural world and our roles in healing ourselves; to insure environmental justice; to promote economic alternatives which would contribute to the development of environmentally safe livelihoods; and, to secure our political, economic and cultural liberation that has been denied for over 500 years of colonization and oppression, resulting in the poisoning of our communities and land and the genocide of our peoples, do affirm and adopt these Principles of Environmental Justice.

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Environmental Justice

The Rachel Carson Council (RCC) hosted a panel, “Overcoming Corporate Threats to Academic and Community Environmental Health Research on Industrial Animal Production,” on June 9th at the Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences conference at American University. The event specifically focused an environmental justice lens on the hog industry in North Carolina (NC), addressing the health impacts on communities surrounding confined animal feeding operations, or CAFOs. Panelists included NC Environmental Justice Network co-director Naeema Muhammad, Earthjustice lawyer Marianne Engelman Lado, and RCC President Robert Musil. Tracy Perkins of Howard University moderated the discussion.

Members of North Carolina Environmental Justice Network picket Harris Teeter store in Rocky Mt. in support of Justice at Smithfield Campaign.

This video depicts a panel titled “Labor Movement & International Solidarity in EJ ” on October 17, 2015. This panel was organized during the 17th Annual North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit at Franklinton Center at Bricks in Whitakers, NC.

Rick Dove, a former Neuse RiverKeeper, and Naeema Muhammad, a founding co-director of the North Carolina Justice Network, tell of their work and experiences in working for clean water in North Carolina. Their presentations were given at the Factory Farm Summit in Green Bay, WI, sponsored by Socially Responsible Agriculture Project.

On February 8th, 2014, North Carolina will see the largest, most diverse and visionary cross-issue mass mobilization ever in the state. This assembly is happening in response to regressive legislation that has poured of the North Carolina General Assembly that is adversely affecting North Carolinians.

This video depicts a presentation titled . It also includes a session called “community speak-out and government listening panel”. These presentations took place at the 18 Annual Environmental Justice Summit.

This is a video recording of the keynote speech from Manzoor Cheema during the 2015 EJ Summit.

This video depicts a concert in celebration of Steve Wing on October 16, 2015. This concert took place during the 17th Annual North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit at Franklinton Center at Bricks in Whitakers, NC.

This video depicts a panel titled “Connecting EJ and International Solidarity Against State Violence ” on October 17, 2015. This panel was organized during the 17th Annual North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit at Franklinton Center at Bricks in Whitakers, NC

This video features a forum titled “EJ and Forward Together/Not One Step Back” at the 16th Annual Environmental Justice Summit. This summit took place at Whitakers, NC, on Oct. 17-18, 2014, and was organized by Environmental Justice Network.

This video depicts an award ceremony during the 17th Annual North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit at Franklinton Center at Bricks in Whitakers, NC.

In North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Georgia, millions of residents are bracing for the arrival of Hurricane Florence, which meteorologists are warning could unleash life-threatening storm surges and historic flooding across a wide swath of the East Coast. Even if the storm weakens, experts warn Hurricane Florence could kill thousands of farm animals and trigger catastrophic waste spills from sewage treatment plants, hog waste lagoons and chicken farms. Many of the factory hog farms in North Carolina store their waste by spraying it on nearby fields and neighborhoods, or by depositing it in lagoons that can overflow during hurricanes, causing the toxic pig manure to pour into nearby waterways. We speak with Naeema Muhammad organizing co-director for the North Carolina Environmental Justice Network and Will Hendrick, staff attorney with the Waterkeeper Alliance. Courtesy of Democracy Now.

Property of the NC Environmental Justice Network.

There are nearly 9 million pigs in North Carolina… and 10 million humans. There are a dozen counties in in the state where pigs actually outnumber humans, but most of these animals live their short lives in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). They are rarely if ever seen by the general public…

This video depicts an event titled “Steve Wing Celebration” on October 16, 2015, during the 17th Annual North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit at Franklinton Center at Bricks in Whitakers, NC.

Naeema Muhammed of the North Carolina Environmental Justice Network describes the environmental devastation caused by the pork industry in North Carolina. She is interviewed by Mikisa Thompson of Workers World Party.

In eastern North Carolina, residents are battling with one of the state’s largest industries: hog farms. Last week, North Carolina lawmakers passed House Bill 467, which limits the damages that residents could collect against hog farms. The billion-dollar industry is primarily clustered in the eastern part of the state, where hog farms collect billions of gallons of untreated pig feces and urine in what are essentially cesspools, then dispose of the waste by spraying it into the air. Residents living in the area of the spray complain of adverse health effects and odor so bad that it limits their ability to be outdoors. For more, we speak with Naeema Muhammad, organizing co-director for the North Carolina Environmental Justice Network, and Will Hendrick, staff attorney with the Waterkeeper Alliance and manager of the organization’s North Carolina Pure Farms, Pure Waters campaign. Courtesy of Democracy Now.

Naeema Muhammed tells of her visit to the community of Santa Cruz in Rio de Janeiro, and the toxic burden that community is facing at the hands of industry.

This video includes interviews with community members about the issues they face in their communities and how the Environmental Justice Network helped them to address these issues.

This video includes interviews with community members about how they discovered the Environmental Justice Network and what it has meant for their organizational and community success.

EPA’s EJ Legal Tools examines legal responsibilities for EPA policy makers to consider in their efforts to address EJ under Plan EJ 2014.

A “must-read” for understanding the responsibilities that Federal agencies must adhere to when addressing Environmental Justice in minority populations and low-income populations.

The President’s Memorandum of Understanding to Executive Order 12898, signed February 11, 1994.

HIA is a systematic process administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that provides advice on how communities can stay healthy.

NC DENR’s Environmental Equity Initiative, effective October 19, 2000, which outlines DENR’s goals for Environmental Equity and strategy to achieve the EJ goals.

Find health department contact information by county on the NC Association of Local Health Directors’ Health Depts. by County website.

This site, established by the NC Dept. of Public Health, provides free fact sheets, studies, and information on health hazards and environmental conditions.

This site provides free access to numerous databases, text files, and conferences on the environment.

The US Dept. of Justice’s website for Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The roots of institutional racism are deep and difficult to eliminate. Even in today’s society, racism influences where a person lives, works and plays. Racism also influences the likelihood of exposure to environmental toxins.

EJCOCs provide valuable opportunities to better understand environmental justice problems. EJCOCs should be targeted by policy-makers for environmental reparations or remedies to compensate or restore environmental quality to comparable levels and should be afforded special protection from additional adverse impacts.

WE, THE PEOPLE OF COLOR, gathered together at this multinational People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit, to begin to build a notional and international movement of all peoples of color to fight the destruction and taking of our lands and communities, do hereby re-establish our spiritual interdependence to the sacredness of our Mother Earth; to respect and celebrate each of our cultures, languages and beliefs about the natural world and our roles in healing ourselves; to insure environmental justice; to promote economic alternatives which would contribute to the development of environmentally safe livelihoods; and, to secure our political, economic and cultural liberation that has been denied for over 500 years of colonization and oppression, resulting in the poisoning of our communities and land and the genocide of our peoples, do affirm and adopt these Principles of Environmental Justice.

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